The Table of Exposure

Surgery: The Table of Exposure

So far we have considered what it takes to prepare for surgery and the fear that we have to face prior to surgery. I will further define surgery within this context as we contemplate laying on the table of exposure.

Surgery in our context here provides an allegorical perspective of the process we go through in moving through phases of spiritual maturation.   The preparation phase is that place we come to once we realize that surgery is necessary.  The fear phase, as described in the previous post, revolves around the inevitable changes that will take place in us as a result of the surgery.

Surgery is the sanctifying process the Lord performs in conforming us to the likeness of His Son.  In this process we will find ourselves uncomfortably vulnerable in uncontrollable situations.  This is the table of exposure.

At the time of surgery a person must allow themselves to be completely exposed.  They lay upon a table as the doctor(s) and the assisting team invade their body.  The one on the table is in their most vulnerable state, whether conscious or unconscious, having no control of the hands of the surgeon.

Laying on the table is a voluntary action, as being exposed to God should be for the one whose hope is in Christ.  It takes laying on the table of exposure to have the things that keep us from living a life to Christ “removed”.  The table of exposure is that place where a believer allows the Lord to place them on the path to discipleship.

The table is the beginning of the healing process.  The thing about healing is that before you can be healed you must be broken.  It is the process of brokenness that we often attempt to avoid.  However, in order to experience healing we must be broken.  In order to experience a break through we must be broken through and through.

Being broken is not something enjoyable because it always leaves scars.  Every surgery leaves scars.  Every place of exposure ultimately leaves memorable and often visible scars.

As we lay upon the table of exposure we realize that something is going to be “cut out” of us.  We should remember that no matter how many “surgeries” we must endure, and no matter how many things get “cut out” of us we are never left with being less of who are but less of who we were and more of who we are.

The table of exposure is the beginning of the healing process.  We must experience brokenness to be healed.  On this table we must, as singer DeWayne Woods declared, let go and let God.  Our victorious life is connected to those things that die from within us along the way — those things the Lord will “cut out”.

Scars are evidence that you have allowed yourself to be vulnerable, exposed and cut.  More importantly though, scars are the evidence that healing is real.

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